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Tower of London

Introduction

The Tower of London has many important buildings and collections to explore and
educational and entertaining events to take part in. This guide will help you plan
your day.
 

The White Tower

Begun in the reign of William the Conqueror (1066-1087), the White Tower marks the start of the Tower of London's history as both a palace and a fortress. The White Tower is undergoing major refurbishment and exhibitions are opening in stages this year.
 

The Royal Armouries

The Royal Armouries derive from the great arsenal at the Tower which supplied armour and weapons to the medieval English kings and their armies. The present collection took shape in the reign of Henry VIII (1509-1547) who restocked the Tower and set up a workshop in Greenwich. The Royal Armouries' collection at the Tower of London is displayed in the White Tower.

The Crown Jewels

The Tower of London has been home to the world-famous Crown Jewels since the beginning of the 14th century. Still used by the Queen and the Royal Family, the Crown Jewels are an essential part of your visit to the Tower of London. Newly displayed in 1994, it is now possible to view the Crown Jewels at close quarters. See Crowns & Diamonds for special exhibition details.

Crowns & Diamonds

The Martin Tower houses a special exhibition, Crowns & Diamonds: the making of the Crown Jewels. The exhibition explains the evolution of British crowns and the role that diamonds play in their decoration, including the stories of two of the most famous diamonds in the world, the Koh-i-Noor and Cullinan II. Included in the display are five royal crowns that were in use between 1715 and 1939 and over 12,000 diamonds. The Medieval Palace

The Tower of London was a residence for the kings and queens of England as well as being a fortress. These rooms are shown as they may have appeared during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307). Presentations by costumed guides and an exhibition about how the buildings were restored can be found inside.
 

The Yeoman Warders

Yeoman Warders (often called 'Beefeaters') have been at the Tower of London since the 14th century. Today they combine their traditional ceremonial role with that of tourist guide. Their role as interpreters of the Tower's history to the public has grown beyond their famous tours. They now also give talks on subjects such as prisoners of the Tower and lead special themed tours (see Events).
 

 The Community of the Tower

Although the Tower of London is today seen as a visitor attraction, it is also a thriving community; about 150 people still live within its walls including the Yeoman Warders (or ‘Beefeaters’) and their families, the Tower Doctor and Chaplain, the Resident Governor and, of course, the famous Ravens.
 

The Ravens

Legend has it that Charles II was told that if the Ravens left the Tower, the monarchy would fall; so he ensured that a limited number would be kept here permanently. The Ravens are cared for by one of the Yeoman Warders, with the title of Ravenmaster. Their lodgings, next to the Wakefield Tower, can be visited.
 

Tower Green

Some of the Tower's most famous and important prisoners were held in the buildings around Tower Green including Sir Walter Ralegh who was imprisoned in the Bloody Tower for 13 years. In front of the Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula is the Scaffold Site where two of Henry VIII's wives, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, were beheaded.
 

The Chapels in the Tower of London

The Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula is the last resting place of all those who died at the Scaffold Site, including Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard. The Chapel was originally outside the castle walls but was brought inside as the Tower expanded to become a church for those living inside. It still performs this role today and consequently can only be visited on a Yeoman Warder guided tour. Visitors are welcome to attend any of its services and details are posted outside the Chapel. The Chapel of St John the Evangelist, in the White Tower, was reserved for the sovereign and his court but is open today to visitors.
 

Traitors' Gate

St Thomas's Tower, above Traitors' Gate, was built between 1275 and 1279 to provide accommodation for the king. The gate provided a new entrance from the river and in time became known as Traitors' Gate because of the number of prisoners accused of treason who are supposed to have passed through it. For prisoners such as Anne Boleyn and Sir Thomas More, the trip was to be their last.
 

The Wall Walk

The Tower of London is surrounded by a series of massive defensive walls. A walk around the eastern section provides an opportunity to see the Martin Tower exhibition - Crowns & Diamonds: the making of the Crown Jewels - and a model showing the Tower as it might have appeared in c1335.
 

The Fusiliers' Museum

The Army has been involved with the Tower of London ever since its creation and today the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, who were founded in 1685 to protect the royal guns within the Tower, open their museum to the public. On display are many fascinating exhibits which illustrate the history of the Regiment. As this is an independent museum, there is a small entrance charge of £0.50.
 

Western Entrance & Water Lane

As you enter the Tower of London through the Middle and Byward towers, it is possible to get an impression of how the Tower was protected against potential attack. Walking along Water Lane you can also see Traitors' Gate where many famous prisoners entered the Tower of London for the last time. Other attractions include the Cradle Tower and Henry III's water-gate.
 

The Wharf and Tower Hill

When the Tower of London was England´s chief storehouse of armaments, much of the Wharf was taken up with the movement and storage of munitions. The Wharf also had a ceremonial role, which it retains today, and since the time of Henry VIII guns have been fired from here on occasions of national rejoicing. Tower Hill was the scene of many executions and today the site of the scaffold is marked by a memorial. Some 125 Tower prisoners died here, most by beheading.

.

Opened daily Mon-Sat 0900-1800, Sun 1000-1800.  Admission is £11 for adults and £7.30 for children (prices subject to change, please call for up to date prices).

Phone 020 7709 0765


Tower Hill Tube

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Tower of London

Einfuehrung:

Der Tower von London ist eines der wichtigsten Bauwerke und besitzt viele wichtige Sammlungen und Bereiche zu erforschen, die sehr lehrreich sind. Ausserdem werden sehr unterhaltsame Events geboten. Der folgende Fuehrer wird Ihnen helfen Ihren Tag zu planen.
 

The White Tower

Durch die Herrschaft von William the Conqueror ("William der Eroberer") (1066-1087) begann mit dem "White Tower" Londoner Geschichte des Towers in Form eines Palastes und einer Festung. Der "White Tower" wurde einer kompletten Renovierung unterzogen und Ausstellungen sind dieses Jahr nur etappenweise geoeffnet.
 

The Royal Armouries

Die koenigliche Waffenkammer The Royal Armouries derive from the great arsenal at the Tower which supplied armour and weapons to the medieval English kings and their armies. The present collection took shape in the reign of Henry VIII (1509-1547) who restocked the Tower and set up a workshop in Greenwich. The Royal Armouries' collection at the Tower of London is displayed in the White Tower.

The Crown Jewels

The Tower of London has been home to the world-famous Crown Jewels since the beginning of the 14th century. Still used by the Queen and the Royal Family, the Crown Jewels are an essential part of your visit to the Tower of London. Newly displayed in 1994, it is now possible to view the Crown Jewels at close quarters. See Crowns & Diamonds for special exhibition details.

Crowns & Diamonds

The Martin Tower houses a special exhibition, Crowns & Diamonds: the making of the Crown Jewels. The exhibition explains the evolution of British crowns and the role that diamonds play in their decoration, including the stories of two of the most famous diamonds in the world, the Koh-i-Noor and Cullinan II. Included in the display are five royal crowns that were in use between 1715 and 1939 and over 12,000 diamonds. The Medieval Palace

The Tower of London was a residence for the kings and queens of England as well as being a fortress. These rooms are shown as they may have appeared during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307). Presentations by costumed guides and an exhibition about how the buildings were restored can be found inside.
 

The Yeoman Warders

Yeoman Warders (often called 'Beefeaters') have been at the Tower of London since the 14th century. Today they combine their traditional ceremonial role with that of tourist guide. Their role as interpreters of the Tower's history to the public has grown beyond their famous tours. They now also give talks on subjects such as prisoners of the Tower and lead special themed tours (see Events).
 

 The Community of the Tower

Although the Tower of London is today seen as a visitor attraction, it is also a thriving community; about 150 people still live within its walls including the Yeoman Warders (or ‘Beefeaters’) and their families, the Tower Doctor and Chaplain, the Resident Governor and, of course, the famous Ravens.
 

The Ravens

Legend has it that Charles II was told that if the Ravens left the Tower, the monarchy would fall; so he ensured that a limited number would be kept here permanently. The Ravens are cared for by one of the Yeoman Warders, with the title of Ravenmaster. Their lodgings, next to the Wakefield Tower, can be visited.
 

Tower Green

Some of the Tower's most famous and important prisoners were held in the buildings around Tower Green including Sir Walter Ralegh who was imprisoned in the Bloody Tower for 13 years. In front of the Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula is the Scaffold Site where two of Henry VIII's wives, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, were beheaded.
 

The Chapels in the Tower of London

The Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula is the last resting place of all those who died at the Scaffold Site, including Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard. The Chapel was originally outside the castle walls but was brought inside as the Tower expanded to become a church for those living inside. It still performs this role today and consequently can only be visited on a Yeoman Warder guided tour. Visitors are welcome to attend any of its services and details are posted outside the Chapel. The Chapel of St John the Evangelist, in the White Tower, was reserved for the sovereign and his court but is open today to visitors.
 

Traitors' Gate

St Thomas's Tower, above Traitors' Gate, was built between 1275 and 1279 to provide accommodation for the king. The gate provided a new entrance from the river and in time became known as Traitors' Gate because of the number of prisoners accused of treason who are supposed to have passed through it. For prisoners such as Anne Boleyn and Sir Thomas More, the trip was to be their last.
 

The Wall Walk

The Tower of London is surrounded by a series of massive defensive walls. A walk around the eastern section provides an opportunity to see the Martin Tower exhibition - Crowns & Diamonds: the making of the Crown Jewels - and a model showing the Tower as it might have appeared in c1335.
 

The Fusiliers' Museum

The Army has been involved with the Tower of London ever since its creation and today the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, who were founded in 1685 to protect the royal guns within the Tower, open their museum to the public. On display are many fascinating exhibits which illustrate the history of the Regiment. As this is an independent museum, there is a small entrance charge of £0.50.
 

Western Entrance & Water Lane

As you enter the Tower of London through the Middle and Byward towers, it is possible to get an impression of how the Tower was protected against potential attack. Walking along Water Lane you can also see Traitors' Gate where many famous prisoners entered the Tower of London for the last time. Other attractions include the Cradle Tower and Henry III's water-gate.
 

The Wharf and Tower Hill

When the Tower of London was England´s chief storehouse of armaments, much of the Wharf was taken up with the movement and storage of munitions. The Wharf also had a ceremonial role, which it retains today, and since the time of Henry VIII guns have been fired from here on occasions of national rejoicing. Tower Hill was the scene of many executions and today the site of the scaffold is marked by a memorial. Some 125 Tower prisoners died here, most by beheading.

.

Opened daily Mon-Sat 0900-1800, Sun 1000-1800.  Admission is £11 for adults and £7.30 for children (prices subject to change, please call for up to date prices).

Phone 020 7709 0765


Tower Hill Tube



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